Dive Into Rust at ORDINATEUR’17

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The event is focused on introducing and teaching the state of art system programming language Rust to local programmers and Mozillians in Gujarat.  This is the first time Mozilla will participate at ORDINATEUR’17! The summit will involve students and tech enthusiasts from the university. I gave a talk on Rust programming which is one of emerging technologies and one of the major focus of Mozilla.

About ORDINATEUR’17 :

ORDINATEUR’17 is a one of a kind flagship event organized by IEEE GCET Computer Society Student Chapter under the them “Tech Trend & Innovate

Before, I shared my experience with this talk, so let me tell you one thing that this was my one of the best intellectual programming debate talk. Yes, it is! 😀 Continue reading

Rain Of Rust – How we did it?

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Growing up I was a tech geek, always kept myself updated with the latest ongoing in the language world. It always excited me to explore the tiny bits of these platforms and constantly kept myself updated with brushing my knowledge.

About 9 months ago I met Manish Goregaokar, who works in Mozilla as a Rust/Servo Contributor met me at Mozilla India meetup which was organized by Mozilla India team and I was one of the core team member organizing that event. He introduced me this programming language and gradually I became very fond of it, finding it very interesting and exciting to explore this language.

Eventually after spending some time, analyzing and exploring this programme, I discovered that masses including students, startups, developers are not completely aware, very few users actually being aware about Rust. Even after spending a quality time on this programming language, I still feel I have a whole new world to be discovered up in front of me. Simultaneously I thought it would be wise to educate users regarding Rust language. I seeked help from my mentors,friends and staff from Mozilla in setting up a campaign to spread awareness about Rust. This is how we came up with Rain Of Rust campaigns.

About Rain Of Rust :

Rain of Rust Campaign, a month-long global campaign in which would be specifically focused on the Rust language. It has taken place in June 2017 in collaboration with the Rust community.

Key stats of RainOfRust campaign June 2017:

  • 19 offline events across 10 regions globally. Ref
  • 4 online meeting which is recorded in Air Mozilla. Ref
  • As part of the campaign the RainOfRust has Rust teaching kits which currently has 3 application-oriented activities
  • The Github repo has received more than 500+ views in the within 1 month, Read more

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Why should I use Rust?

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With respect to subject of my blog, this might be the questions of all who heard about this programming language or who have attended any rust session/workshops very first time. Recently when I was traveling to some cities in India for Rust campaign called RainOfRust, that time one 2nd year engineering student who attended one of my session asked me this question, “Why should I use Rust?” when my session got over.

Well, this was the best questions so far anyone asked me during this campaign and I loved to shared how I answered that.

You might thought that I have started my conversation with this general definition that,

Rust is a systems programming language that runs blazingly fast, prevents segfaults, and guarantees thread safety.

This the common definition which everybody knows. I always believe that you should share your things the way you understand or the you adopt it. This way your thoughts spread better among all who listened to you.

Rust is a good choice when you’d choose C++. You can also say, “Rust is a systems programming language that pursuing the trifecta: safe, concurrent, and fast.” I would say, Rust is an ownership-oriented programming language.

Here is my definition and from here I started to explained him, after sometime some more students joined the conversation and it became more interesting.

Firstly, the reason that I’ve looked into Rust at first.

  • Rust is new enough that you can write useful stuff that would have already existed in other languages
  • It gives a relatively familiar tool to the modern C++ developers, but in the much more consistent and reliable ways.
  • It is low-level enough that you take account of most resources.
  • Its more like C++ and Go, less like Node and Ruby
  • cargo is awesome. Managing crates just works as intended, which makes a whole lot of troubles you may have in other languages just vanish with a satisfying poof.

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Installing Rust on Windows

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Installing Rust can be as easy as pulling down an installer and double clicking. For developers working with more complex tools or who need to build unsafe C/C++ libraries from source, there’s a little bit of extra work that needs to be done, but it’s nothing that a savvy person can’t handle.

Throughout this whole process, make sure you keep installing the right version of libraries – Rust is currently 64-bit only for MSVC. You’ll get bizarro errors at various points if you mess up and try to use 32-bit libraries or prereqs with Rust. Trust me.

Again – if all you need is a Rust compiler, jump over to https://www.rust-lang.org/ and click “Install”. If you plan on working with natively compiled C/C++ libraries, then read on! Continue reading

Installing Rust on Ubuntu & Fedora

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Rust, commonly known as Rust-Lang, is a system programming language that is developed by Mozilla and backed by LLVM. Rust is known for preventing program crashes, memory leaks, and data races before it is compiled into binary, thus creating a highly-productive and stable programming environment. This article will show you how to install Rust onto Ubuntu 14.04 x64, 16.04 x64 and Fedora box.

Let’s setup on Ubuntu :

System Update

Open terminal and run the following commands to ensure that package source list is upto date and also install curl

For Ubuntu 16.04

sudo apt update && sudo apt -y install curl

For Ubuntu 14.04

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y install curl

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